Focus On The Fight | Hereditary Lymphedema

Focus On The Fight | Hereditary Lymphedema

Welcome to Focus On The Fight, a series of interviews that will be posted weekly, focusing on a blogger/advocate, their health and their advocacy work.

This week we meet Jordyn, and we will highlight: Hereditary Lymphedema aka Primary Lymphedema.


Before we dive into the heavy stuff, please tell us all a little about yourself outside of your health! About your family or your hobbies !!

I love to cuddle my service dog, read books, blog, crochet, share my story online, and talk to my friends. I also especially love to garden when it's summertime.

What Chronic Illness (es) have you been diagnosed with? Which one will you focus on today?

Hereditary Lymphedema Erythromelalgia Ehlers Danlos Syndrome Type 3 Chronic Fatigue Postural Syndrome Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Daily Migraines Asthma MTHFR mutation. Today I will be focusing on my Hereditary Lymphedema.

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Dear Medical Provider | A Letter The Medical Community

Dear Medical Provider | A Letter The Medical Community

Dear Medical Professional,


I know, it’s so easy to see a diagnosis or a medication in a chart and form judgment on someone before you ever meet them. I’ve been there, I’ve done that. I would be lying if I said I hadn’t. That being said now that I am on the other side of the bed I ask that you hold that judgement until you meet me. We aren’t all alike, just like you aren’t like your sibling or your cousin with the same last name who no one speaks of. All chronic illness patients are different. We may have the same diagnosis and take the same medications but that’s often where the similarities stop.

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Focus On The Fight | Hyperhidrosis - Maria Thomas

Focus On The Fight | Hyperhidrosis - Maria Thomas

Welcome to Focus On The Fight, a series of interviews that will be posted every Friday, focusing on a blogger and their health.

This week we will meet Maria Thomas, she has a multitude of chronic condition including the condition we will highlight this week: HYPERHIDROSIS

Before we dive into the heavy stuff, please tell us all a little about yourself outside of your health! About your family or your hobbies!! I'm a bookworm, writer, editor, and a hyperhidrosis trailblazer and patient advocate. I work full-time in marketing, and my side hustle is my advocacy work. When I'm not going 90 miles an hour, I enjoy reading (obviously), handwriting letters to my pen pals, spending time in nature and playing with my Pug, Maya.

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What’s In My Hospital Bag | 2019 Spoonie Edition

What’s In My Hospital Bag | 2019 Spoonie Edition

Sadly over the last few years I have spent many nights in the hospital. I even took a week long trip to Mayo Clinic In Minnesota, and have had a couple overnight trips for treatment. Thankfully, it’s been awhile and I hope I don’t jinx myself by sharing all of this.  That being said I was cleaning out my bag and thought I would share.

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Focus On The Fight | Endometriosis

Focus On The Fight | Endometriosis

Welcome to this weeks Spoonie Spotlight. A new series where writers with different chronic conditions will be featured. Along with a brief discussion of what their condition is and what some generic signs and symptoms are for their condition.

This weeks post will highlight: ENDOMETRIOSIS

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Focus On The Fight | Celiac Disease

Focus On The Fight | Celiac Disease

Welcome to this weeks Spoonie Spotlight. A new series where writers with different chronic conditions will be featured. Along with a brief discussion of their condition and a few generic signs and symptoms are for their condition.


This weeks post will highlight:

CELIAC DISEASE.

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This Ones For You | Open Letter To The World

This Ones For You | Open Letter To The World

Hello world! This one is for YOU!! No matter what we do or how hard we try to change things there will always be some level of judgement in the world. Especially in this time where it seems like everyone is shaming others for something. That being said most of us do our best to keep that judgement to ourselves, and don't stare people down. We have the kindness not to make comments when we think someone shouldn't be using a wheelchair, or parking in a handicapped spot or even just wearing a mask out in public. Sadly, there are those  people who can’t seem to keep their thoughts and judgments to them self. This letter is for those who can’t keep their comments to themselves or feel the need to stare others down.

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Does It Get Better? | Living With A Chronic Illness

Does It Get Better? | Living With A Chronic Illness

Today, I stumbled upon a video from a mom who has a son who is on the autism spectrum, and has been for many years. She was talking about an email she had recently received from a mom who was in the thick of a new diagnosis. Her child was recently diagnosed and the mom was struggling, as most people do when they receive the diagnosis of a chronic condition. She asked the seasoned mom if it gets better. She wanted to know if life gets easier at some point. As I watched this woman explain her answer it made me think about how I would answer this question if I was asked. What would I say to someone who was newly diagnosed as someone who has lived with a chronic illness for seven years?

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Chronic Pain | What The Media Doesn’t Tell You

Chronic Pain | What The Media Doesn’t Tell You

 Living with a chronic Illness can be hard, plain and simple. Living with an invisible illness, one that causes chronic pain, is harder. It has become such a common practice for people to quickly judge another person based on their condition or based on their use of narcotic pain meds. It has even become true within our healthcare system and within the government. Sadly it is not uncommon for a patient to be looked upon as an “addict” simply because of a medication that they take. Much of this has happened in response to the media coverage of the Opioid Crisis and how the government is handling the crisis.

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Chronically Cooking | Chicken Tortilla Soup & Banana Bread

Chronically Cooking | Chicken Tortilla Soup & Banana Bread

One of my main goals for 2019 is to spend more time in the kitchen. And no not necessarily eating, but cooking as well. So I’ve been looking for and trying new recipes. In fact I made a couple really good dishes recently and thought I would share them and the stories behind them with you.

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Filing Disability | What Its Really Like

Filing Disability | What Its Really Like

Disability......Has almost become a dirty world for those who are trying to gain disability due to some life altering condition and have been denied. Filing for disability is a long and arduous process at best

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Patient Physician Relationship | How To Handle Bad Care

Patient Physician Relationship | How To Handle Bad Care

Lately I’ve noticed a disturbing trend, healthcare providers that don’t take the time to actually listen to their patients. Or providers that act more like bullies than providers.

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7 Things I Learned From My Chronic Illness That I Never Knew As A Nurse

I can't even begin to count the number of times I have been asked what I have learned from my illness. I also get asked what if anything I have learned about the Healthcare System from being a chronic patient that I didn't learn in all the years I worked as an RN or the years I was in school for my nursing degree. The first few years not much came to mind. But the longer I have had to deal with a chronic illness, the more doctors I have seen, the more insurance companies I have to fight, I have definitely learned some things that my education or work experience NEVER taught me. You may be thinking, how is that even possible, you went through more than 4 years of Nursing Education and worked in the healthcare field for over ten years, how would being chronically ill teach you anything that you didn't already know? Well that is easy. During nursing school or during all those years I worked in healthcare I wasn't the patient. I was the caregiver. I didn't really see what the patients had to deal with just to get the treatments they needed, and I didn't see the judgment that patients feel from the healthcare staff. I will just be completely honest, you have no idea as a healthcare provider what it is like to be on the other side of that bed until you have been on that side yourself!! So lets just jump right in! Rawpixel.com

1. The real meaning of a Chronic Illness - One of the BIGGEST things I have learned from my illness seems silly but I want to be honest. I have learned the true meaning of a CHRONIC ILLNESS. When I took care of patients in the hospital who had a chronic illness it NEVER really hit me just what that meant. I never realized exactly what chronic meant and just how much of their lives are impacted by their chronic disease.

2. Sympathy and Empathy - These are entirely different entities. It is very different sympathizing and trying to understand where someone is coming from. Now that I can empathize as both a patient and as a nurse it has changed my outlook as well as how I interacted with patients and their families. I learned how and why chronic illness patients seem more guarded and at times more fearful than your average patient.

Annie Spratt, mammasaurus.co.uk.store

3. Use of medical jargon - While I was working as a nurse I never realized just how often medical professionals use medical jargon. Most likely because i was using it to. Luckily I understand most of it as a patient. But when I am having one of my bad migraines it is often hard for me to really understand much of anything. It was those days that made me so much aware of just how often medical terminology is used to explain things to patients and families rather than lay terms.

4. Dealing with judgement - Sadly, through the last six years I've had to learn how to deal with judgmental medical staff more than I ever expected. Before I got sick I never realized how quick medical professionals are to judge (myself in the past included). Since being sick with an invisible illness I now know how it feels when people assume things about you based solely on your appearance and not your medical history. Or how it feels when people assume you are drug seeking based on your medical diagnosis before they even come and talk with you. This made a huge impact on me and how I practiced nursing.

5. Being Aware of The Cost of Procedures, Treatments, Treatment Centers & Medications - I'll be 100% honest and say that when I was working ICU Step Down I was not aware of the cost of probably 95% of the medications and treatment modalities we used for our patients. It wasn't because I didn't care, it was simply because I had to know so many other things that this information would take a back seat. On the other side as a patient I am much more aware of what medications cost and how much MRI's or CT Scans will cost and what my out of pocket will be. Simply because I have to pay for it. I feel like there is a break down between providers and patients on this topic. The providers want the best treatment no matter the cost. But the patient would usually prefer the best treatment for the cost. Learning this as a patient definitely changed things I did in my practice. Because I knew what it was like to hear your new medication was going to cost $25,000.

Fabian Blank

6. Honoring Time - What I mean by this is that when you've asked for something for pain and the nurse says "I'll be right back," or "I'll be in at 5pm" with pain meds. But they don't come back for 30 minutes or until 5:15 those minutes feel like hours. As a nurse I always tried to get right back or to go when I said I would. But I never truly understood just how long those 10 or 15 minutes I was gone really felt. When you are hurting or feeling sick to your stomach those 15 minutes may feel like 4 hours!

7. Trust the patient/listen to patient regarding what works for them. I think as a medical professional it's easy to work based on knowledge or experience. But it's really important to listen to the patient in regards to what works. I've learned this because of my migraines. I've dealt with them so long that I know what is going to help and what is a waste of time. And I really appreciate the doctors and nurses who listen to me and don't just throw meds at me because of what they "always give" for migraines.

Needless to say, I have learned so much from being a patient with a chronic illness. I feel like that in some strange way it actually made me a better medical provider. As you can imagine after working in the medical field for many years I have many friends who remain in that field. And due to the things I have experienced with my chronic illness they have been able to learn and improve on the way they practice and treat those they care for who are in similar situations. I will always stand by my feelings that every medical provider should have to be a patient for at least a short period so they can experience things from the other side of the bed. So they can have the full patient experience. Their views on the way they treat patients would be forever changed like mine. That being said, a chronic illness is not something to joke about; however, it has given me a view into a world that I felt I was fully enveloped in, which I had never fully seen before. And for that I will always be grateful.

With Love,

Amber

What You Need To Know About Headaches......Part 3

I had hoped to get my migraine series finished before the end of June, which was migraine awareness month. However, sadly I spent most of the last week of June in the hospital with a MIGRAINE. I had dealt with it for over ten days and finally waved the white flag, cried uncle and went to the hospital. I was hoping that I would be able to break the migraine by just getting medications in the ER. But no luck, I had to be admitted for four days. So finishing this treatment section of the migraine series seems appropriate, as I spent the last couple weeks living in this phase of a migraine. So how do you treat a migraine??? Well, that's really a hard question to answer. What works for me may not work for you and vice versa.  And I have found it to be more a case of trial and error of what might work. I have tried SO MANY medications and treatment options over the years. Even thought I have been on this migraine journey for over 15 years I am not totally sure that I have found the perfect mix yet. In the early years I only had migraines periodically, it wasn't until the last three years that they have really become debilitating.  I also didn't start having the hemiplegic (stroke like) migraines until 2016. One of the big things I can't stress enough when you are on the search for the best treatment for your migraines is to keep a journal of your symptoms, what you did, what you ate etc on the day of your headaches so you can see if there is something recurring with each migraine. So lets dig in to treatment options.

The most common treatment for migraines are medications. Whether you take over the counter meds, preventative meds or meds for the acute head. Below you will see the each type of medication explained.

  • Over the counter (OTC) medications are medications that can be bought without a prescription on the counter at any pharmacy.
  • Acute medications are used as soon as a migraine is happening. These are also known as abortive medications.
  • Preventative Medications are used on an ongoing or routine bases, in hope that they will prevent or reduce future attacks. These can also be called prophylactic medications.

Over the counter options for acute symptoms include:

  • Excedrin Migraine
  • Ibuprofen which is also known as Advil and Motrin
  • Naproxen which is also known as Aleve
  • Aspirin (you need to check with your physician before taking this medication as it is also a blood thinner)
  • Acetaminophen which is also known as Tylenol

Examples of prescription drugs you might be given to take for acute (when the headache is happening) symptoms include:

  • Triptans are a class of medications that deal with the chemical Serotonin in the brain, which helps to diminish the swelling of the blood vessels that cause the headaches. These drugs are primarily used in the treatment of acute headaches. This method of treatment goes back to the 1950s. Examples: Maxalt & Imitrex.
  • DHE 45 became a treatment for migraines in the 1940s. It is only used to treat migraines in the ACUTE stage and should not be used as a preventative medication. This medication is available as an injection, IV drip and nasal spray.
  • Ergotamine is a medication that is used for a SPECIFIC kind of headache. It is used to treat vascular and tension headaches. The medication works to narrow the widened blood vessels in the head, which in turn reduces the throbbing effects of vascular headaches. This medication is also used only in treatment of acute headaches.

Examples of medications that are given as  preventive or prophylactic prescription medications include:

  • Beta blockers (Use caution with these as they can also lower the blood pressure and heart rate) This group of medication is used as a preventative medication to treat migraines. They work to relax and open up blood flow thus reducing the frequency of headaches.  Examples: Propanolol or Toprolol.
  • Calcium Channel Blockers (Use caution with these as they can lower the heart rate) This group of medication is used because of the way it works, basically the end result is that this group of medications prevent contraction of the muscle wall of the artery.  Examples: Procardia or Verapamil
  • Antidepressants are often used as a preventative medication for headaches because the tricyclic antidepressants also work to treat chronic pain. Thus they work well for migraines.  Example: Elavil
  • Anticonvulsants this group of medication work to calm the hyperactivity in the brain. Example: Depakote, Topamax, Gabapentin

There are also many other options for migraines. One of the most common is the Complementary & Alternative Medicine. This option includes any medicinal products or practices that are not part of modern medicine. Alternative medicine can be defined by its use an an alternative option to traditional modern medicine. Complementary medicine is used in conjunction with traditional medical treatment. These treatments could be things like: any natural remedies like herbal medications or treatments, vitamins, minerals or any kind of supplements. There are many options of herbal medications, which I have tried, the one I personally had the most luck with was feverfew. Other options would include meditation, yoga, biofeedback, acupuncture, tai-chi. Or even body-based practices like chiropractic adjustments or massage therapy. Like always, before starting any new over the counter medication, herb or supplement. Or any increase in physical activity please check with a dr before doing so!

In addition to medications and alternative or complementary therapy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has now approved two different nerve stimulators that may be helpful for certain people who have not gotten any relief from all other treatment options. The Cerena Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator is a device that has been approved for anyone over the age of 18 who have migraines that are preceded by an aura. This specific device is help to the back of the head and will deliver a pulse of magnetic energy.

There is also a vagus nerve stimulator that has been approved for use in adults with migraines, as well as those who suffer from episodic cluster headaches. This device is hand-held and is placed over the vagus nerve in the neck and it releases a mild electrical stimulation to reduce pain.

In 2010 Botox, previously primarily known for its use by plastic surgeons, was approved for use with chronic migraines. Currently the FDA has only approved Botox use in those with chronic migraines, which means a person must have 15 or more headache days a month. Research shows that the more frequent the headaches the better the Botox result will be. Botox is given as approximately 30 tiny Injections around the head, the injections are given around pain fibers that are involved in headaches. Botox will enter the nerve endings around the injection site and then blocks the release of chemicals involved in pain. This in turn prevents activations of the pain networks of the brain. Patients who receive Botox can only receive injections every 12 weeks. And it generally takes 3-4 treatments at least to begin to fill the full impact it may have. Botox requires pre-authorization by the insurance company before it can be given. Along with very detailed documentation by the doctor regarding the frequency and duration of your headaches.

In early 2018 the FDA approved the first drug of its kind for migraines. It is said to reduce the number of migraines among those who are prone to migraines. Most of the medications currently used for migraines are used to control the symptoms. The new drug, called Aimovig, is designed to reduce the number of migraines among the population who suffer most frequently. One of the largest studies done during the testing stage showed that the number of migraines dropped from eight to fewer than five. This medication is given as an injection, much like insulin, delivered by a pen-like device. The one big downfall for some is that the medication will cost around $6,900 a year, and insurance coverage is not completely decided at this point!!

I hope each of you enjoyed this series on migraines and that maybe you learned something you didn't know. I know I learned a LOT while doing the research for this series. Migraines are so complex and I could have probably written a five part series or even more. There are so many options of medications available along with many more non-medicinal treatments available, than in years past. And so much research is being done to find the best treatment available for migraines. I didn't cover Botox in much detail and there is a lot of information I could share. If you are interested in learning more about Botox or the new medication Aimovig leave me a comment and let me know. Also, if you have a condition that you would like me to do a series of posts on let me know and I will dig in and start my research. This has been pretty popular so I am looking forward to doing more multi-part series in the future.

With Love,

Amber

The Truth Behind Photosensitivity

By AMY NORASummer is officially here. It means we go to the beach, we sit outside at the Ballpark, we go and plan for those wonderful picnics, we spend time with family barbecuing, it's about the time with friends family and just enjoying those wonderful late nights at the lake. The other thing is that we are out in the Sun a lot. When you have an autoimmune disease that also means that most likely you experience photosensitivity. Photosensitivity is that nasty little friends that accompanies us everywhere. It means that we lather on that sunscreen as if, well honestly, she were our best friend. We layer it on at 2 hour intervals as if our lives depended on it; ironically in a way our lives do depend on it."Photosensitivity is the term used to describe sensitivity to the ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight and other light sources, such as indoor fluorescent light. Photosensitivity can cause rashes, fever, fatigue, joint pain, and other symptoms in people with both cutaneous (skin) and systemic lupus. Excess exposure to UV rays is a common trigger for increased disease activity (flare) of both cutaneous lupus and systemic lupus." (Lupus Foundation of America)Remember, with the 4th of July holiday coming and summer here,  have fun but also protect yourself.  Use sunscreen often, stay in shaded areas but remember you are still exposed to UV rays, wear hats, and just be smart. Lupus Love...

What Abbreviation CDC Means For The Chronically Ill

When you hear someone say CDC I'm sure the first thing you think of is Centers for Disease Control! I thought the same until earlier this year. In early spring I joined a twitter chat on Healthcare and insurance issues faced by the chronically ill. It was a great chat and I felt a lot of issues were brought to the forefront. Due to this chat I found (they actually found me) a great organization called The Chronic Disease Coalition (CDC). Once I took time to look into the organization, I really liked the work they do – advocating for those with chronic illness by promoting awareness and encouraging all to take action Per Below, I will tell you more about this incredible organization and how you can become involved if this is something that speaks to you!

The nonprofit organization was founded in 2015 with the goal to create a platform for people with chronic conditions to speak out and take action to make a difference in their community, state or even across the United States. The CDC dedicates their time to protect patients’ rights and fight against discriminatory practices or policies that prevent patients from accessing care. Since the day they became an organization they have focused their efforts to advocate for people who live with lifelong chronic conditions like, MS, diabetes, lupus, kidney disease and cancer. The CDC promotes awareness and education in hopes that they can raise public awareness of the chronic health issues that we deal with on a daily basis. They do this in conjunction with encouraging other to engage in advocacy and provide advocacy tools that help fightagainst discriminatory practices As a whole, they recognize that we are strongest together, so they enable supporters to speak out and do the same when help may be needed to protect the rights of all patients.

One of the big things that this organization spends a lot of time on are the health issues that are being dealt with by the government at both state and federal levels. They really encourage us to get involved with any issues that may put patients lives or access to care in danger. Recently, they have been focusing a lot of time on the opioid crisis. Many have written letters, sent emails or called their representative to educate them on the issue. They have also been focusing attention on legislation across the country that would allow insurance companies to reject coverage for individuals simply because part of their medical bills are being paid by nonprofit organizations! This could mean that people would be unable to receive care of any kind, and would be especially dangerous for those who rely on treatment to stay alive.

If you visit the CDC Website you can find the facts on all the issues that have resulted from insurers, policymakers and others within the health space, trying to cut corners and increase their profits and the patient’s expense. They provide information about the problems that the chronically ill may face with insurance companies, in the workplace or at school! The website also gives you the options of sharing your experience dealing with all the issues brought upon by chronic illness. As well as the option to take action and write your legislators about some of the big issues like the ones mentioned above.

You also have the option to join the coalition.When you join the coalition you will receive information on the important issues and alerts when they need you to help stand up for patients rights. I joined the coalition in March of this year, and it has been a great experience. I have learned so much and realized just how much I didn't know about the real issues at hand. If you are concerned that they will overtake your inbox with alerts and such, that is not the case. I may get as many as 5 emails a month. In those emails we receive information about bills that we need to focus on or ways that we can help spread awareness or act as an advocate.

I asked a few of my "co-advocates" why they decided to join forces with the CDC and this is what they said.

I am an advocate because it seems like a lot of what we go through is unspoken in our society. I really want to bring a focus to those of us who struggle with chronic diseases and pain on a regular basis. I want lawmakers to know what we go through, so they can make informed choices, instead of voting against our interests. -Gwendolyn Bahu

I chose to become an advocate because I don’t want anyone to go through what I have with endometriosis or any other illness. Chronic diseases are debilitating and wreak havoc on every aspect of our lives and desperately need more funding and awareness. I decided to be part of the Chronic Disease Coalition to help others and bring more awareness to chronic illnesses. - Samantha Bowick

If this organization sounds like one you. would liked to get involved with make sure to go to their website and find out more about getting involved. It feels so good to know that you are working on something that could impact thousands of lives.

With Love,

Amber

**All pictures used for this post were taken from the CDCs Website with approval**

What You Need To Know About Headaches....... Part 1

June is headache awareness month, so let's take some time to look at all things headache. There are said to be 150 different kinds of headaches from cluster headaches to sinus headaches. And the most commonly known, migraine headaches. Each kind of headache contains some kind of pain and that pain can be located indifferent parts of the head based on the kind of headache! We will also look at other symptoms that accompany the headache that range from nausea to double vision. Below in part one of a three part series we will talk about the types of headaches that are most common, as well as possible causes for headaches overall. So let's just jump right in!

Most Common Types of Headaches

The two most common kinds of headaches are tension headaches and migraines so we will discuss those first.

Tension Headaches- These are the most common type of headache among teenagers and adults. Generally, this type of headache causes mild to moderate pain and come and go over time. On most occasions they have no other symptoms. It is said that 80-90% of the population suffer with this kind of headache at some point in their life. Overall, 80% of women and 69% of males will experience tension headaches. With age of first onset is usually between 9 & 12 years of age.

Migraine Headaches- These Headaches are often described as "intense." The pain from a migraine is often described as pounding or throbbing pain, and often last from a few hours to a few days at a time. The frequency is going to be different for everyone but on average happen one to four times a month, or potentially more. Sadly most who suffer from migraines also deal with other symptoms that accompany the headache. The symptoms can range from person to person, but the most common are sensitivity to light, noise or smells. Migraines can also bring on nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, belly pain or upset stomach. For children with migraines their symptoms can be different. They can look pale, feel dizzy, have blurry vision, a fever or an upset stomach.

Research shows about 16-17% of the population will suffer from migraines at some point, with the median age of onset between 5-8 years of age. Migraines are by far the most debilitating kind of headache. It is said that 25% of women and 8% of men suffer from migraines. Research shows that 60% of migraines present on one side of the head. 80% of migraine sufferers report that there are some kind of trigger that causes their headache. Just to give you an idea of how many people suffer from migraines and how much of their lives are dedicated to dealing with migraines. It is reported that 157 million work hours are missed each year due to migraines.

Other Types of Headaches

Cluster Headaches- Those who experience these headaches say that this type of headache is intense and feels like a burning or piercing pain behind or around one eye, and is usually throbbing or constant. It is the least common type of headache but often causes the most severe type of headache. People who suffer from these headaches often say the pain is so severe that they can't sit still and will often be seen pacing during an attack. The pain is often said to be one sided and the eyelid can droop on the side of the pain. The eye may redden, while the pupil decreases in size or tears. The nostril on the side of the head where the pain is can either run or feel stuff. The reason they are called cluster headaches is because they tend to happen in groups. They may happen one to three times a day during a cluster period, and that period may last 2 weeks to 3 months. And each single headache attack may last 15min to 3 hours and may often wake the patient up from sleep! The headaches may disappear or completely go into a state of remission for months or years. Cluster headaches affect men three to four times more often than women.Sinus Headaches- These headaches often cause a deep and constant pain the cheekbones, forehead or bridge of the nose. They are caused by the sinus cavities in the head becoming inflamed. The headache usually does not come alone, it is usually accompanied by a runny nose, feeling of fullness in the ears, a fever, and even swelling in the face. A true sinus headache is caused by a sinus infection, which usually causes yellow or green discharge from the nose, unlike the clear drainage noted in cluster or migraine headaches.

Hormonal Headaches - Last but definitely not least. These headaches are seen primarily in women. They happen from changing hormone levels during menstrual cycles, pregnancy and menopause. Headaches may also be triggered by birth control pills in some women.

Most Common Causes of Headaches

What actually causes the pain of a headache? The pain that is felt during a headache comes from a mix of signals between the brain, blood vessels and nerves in the area. Specific nerves of the blood vessels and head muscles switch on and send pain signals to your brain. It is not the totally clear why these signals turn on to begin with.

People often get headaches due to:

Illness: Anything from an infection, cold or fever can cause a headache. Also common conditions like inflammation of the sinus cavities, an infection of the throat, or even an ear infection.

Stress: Any kind of emotional stress or depression, as well as alcohol use, skipping meals, change in sleep patterns or taking too much medication.

The environment: things like being around secondhand smoke, strong smells from cleaners or household chemicals, perfumes, allergens, certain foods, pollution, noise, lighting, and weather changes are possible trigger

Trauma: In some cases headaches may be caused by a blow to the head or rarely may be a sign of something more serious.

Other causes can include things like: eyestrain, neck or back pain, poor posture and even to much exercise.

Sadly, Headaches especially migraine headaches, tend to run in families. Most kids and teenagers (90%) that have migraines often are not the only one in the family. Most of the time there are other members of the family who also suffer from migraine headaches. Kids who have two parents that have a history of migraines have a 70% chance that they will also develop migraines. If only one parent has headaches the risk will drops to between 25-50%.

America complain about headaches more than any other medical condition. It is said that there are approximately 45 million Americans who complain of headaches every year. If you break that down it works out to one in every six people or 16.54% of the population who deal with headaches. Research shows that more than 8 million Americans will seek medical treatment for headaches EACH YEAR!

Headaches impact a huge number of people every year. The the causes of headaches are multifaceted, and will impact every body differently. There are over 150 types of headaches and they are each slightly different than the next. What causes one person's headache may not cause the next persons. Be on the lookout for the next part of this series, during which we will be looking at how headaches may be diagnosed. And in the last issue of the series we will be looking into treatment options for migraines.

With Love,

Amber